Legalization of documents is fulfillment of some procedures to bring the document into legal effect at the territory of another state.

Legalization of documents is fulfillment of some procedures to bring the document into legal effect at the territory of another state.
In fact, legalization is confirmation of powers and authenticity of an official’s signature, stamp and seal of the issuing public institution. Upon legalization, such document may be presented to official bodies of another state.
There are two types of legalization of documents:
Apostille service is a method of legalization of documents for submission to offices of states participating in the Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement for Legalization for Foreign Public Documents (signed on October 5, 1961).
Consular legalization is a method of legalization of documents for submission to offices of states NOT participating in the Hague Convention.
Thus, type of legalization if every certain case is selected depending on a state, to official authorities whereof the document is intended to be submitted.
Cases, when no legalization of document is required
1. If establishment, where document is intended to be submitted, requires no legalization.
2. If the document pertains to a type of documents not subject to legalization (documents directly related to commercial or customs transactions: customs declaration, agreements for goods supply and services, various works and calculations, invoices, documents of product transfer across the border, etc., documents not complying with Russian legislation, or documents, content whereof may cause damage to interests of the Russian Federation).
3. If Russia and the state, where the document is intended to be used, signed an international treaty about legal mutual assistances, according whereto, there is a simplified document flow schedule between them abolishing need in legalization.
Bilateral treaties on legal assistance in civil cases:
Arab Republic of Egypt (Moscow, September 23, 1997);
Republic of Azerbaijan (Moscow, December 22, 1992);
People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria (Algeria, February 23, 1982);
Argentine Republic (Moscow, November 20, 2000);
People’s Republic of Hungary (Moscow, July 15, 1958);
Hellenic Republic (Athens, May 21, 1981);
India (New Deli, October 3, 2000);
Republic of Iraq (Moscow, June 22, 1973);
Islamic Republic of Iran (Tehran, March 5, 1996);
People’s Republic of China (Beijing, June 19, 1992);
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (Pyongyang, December 16, 1957);
Kingdom of Spain (Madrid, October 26, 1990);
Republic of Latvia (Riga, February 3, 1993);
Republic of Lithuania (Vilnius, July 21, 1992);
Macedonia (Moscow, February 24, 1962);
People’s Republic of Albania (Moscow, June 30, 1958);
People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen (Moscow, December 6, 1985);
People’s Republic of Bulgaria (Moscow, February 19, 1975);
Republic of Poland (Warsaw, September 16, 1996);
Republic of Moldova (Moscow, February 25, 1992);
Kyrgyz Republic (Bishkek, September 14, 1992); 
Republic of Cyprus (Moscow, January 19, 1984);
People’s Republic of Romania (Moscow, April 3, 1958);
Slovakia (Moscow, August 12, 1982, effective since January 01, 1993);
Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Moscow, December 10, 1981);
Slovenia (Moscow, February 24, 1962);
Czechia (Moscow, August 12, 1982, effective since January 01, 1993);
Republic of Estonia (Moscow, January 26, 1992);
Japan (Tokyo, May 12, 2009).
Convention on Legal Assistance and Legal Relations in Civil, Family and Criminal Cases (Minsk, January 22, 1993). Members of the convention:
Azerbaijan; 
Armenia; 
Belarus; 
Georgia; 
Kazakhstan; 
Kyrgyzstan; 
Moldavia; 
The Russian Federation; 
Tajikistan; 
Turkmenia; 
Uzbekistan; 
Ukraine.

In fact, legalization is confirmation of powers and authenticity of an official’s signature, stamp and seal of the issuing public institution. Upon legalization, such document may be presented to official bodies of another state.

There are two types of legalization of documents:

Apostille service is a method of legalization of documents for submission to offices of states participating in the Hague Convention Abolishing the Requirement for Legalization for Foreign Public Documents (signed on October 5, 1961).

Consular legalization is a method of legalization of documents for submission to offices of states NOT participating in the Hague Convention.

Thus, type of legalization if every certain case is selected depending on a state, to official authorities whereof the document is intended to be submitted.

Cases, when no legalization of document is required

1. If establishment, where document is intended to be submitted, requires no legalization.

2. If the document pertains to a type of documents not subject to legalization (documents directly related to commercial or customs transactions: customs declaration, agreements for goods supply and services, various works and calculations, invoices, documents of product transfer across the border, etc., documents not complying with Russian legislation, or documents, content whereof may cause damage to interests of the Russian Federation).

3. If Russia and the state, where the document is intended to be used, signed an international treaty about legal mutual assistances, according whereto, there is a simplified document flow schedule between them abolishing need in legalization.

Bilateral treaties on legal assistance in civil cases:

Arab Republic of Egypt (Moscow, September 23, 1997);
Republic of Azerbaijan (Moscow, December 22, 1992);
People’s Democratic Republic of Algeria (Algeria, February 23, 1982);
Argentine Republic (Moscow, November 20, 2000);
People’s Republic of Hungary (Moscow, July 15, 1958);
Hellenic Republic (Athens, May 21, 1981);
India (New Deli, October 3, 2000);
Republic of Iraq (Moscow, June 22, 1973);
Islamic Republic of Iran (Tehran, March 5, 1996);
People’s Republic of China (Beijing, June 19, 1992);
Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (Pyongyang, December 16, 1957);
Kingdom of Spain (Madrid, October 26, 1990);
Republic of Latvia (Riga, February 3, 1993);
Republic of Lithuania (Vilnius, July 21, 1992);
Macedonia (Moscow, February 24, 1962);
People’s Republic of Albania (Moscow, June 30, 1958);
People’s Democratic Republic of Yemen (Moscow, December 6, 1985);
People’s Republic of Bulgaria (Moscow, February 19, 1975);
Republic of Poland (Warsaw, September 16, 1996);
Republic of Moldova (Moscow, February 25, 1992);
Kyrgyz Republic (Bishkek, September 14, 1992); 
Republic of Cyprus (Moscow, January 19, 1984);
People’s Republic of Romania (Moscow, April 3, 1958);
Slovakia (Moscow, August 12, 1982, effective since January 01, 1993);
Socialist Republic of Vietnam (Moscow, December 10, 1981);
Slovenia (Moscow, February 24, 1962);
Czechia (Moscow, August 12, 1982, effective since January 01, 1993);
Republic of Estonia (Moscow, January 26, 1992);
Japan (Tokyo, May 12, 2009).
Convention on Legal Assistance and Legal Relations in Civil, Family and Criminal Cases (Minsk, January 22, 1993).

Members of the convention:

Azerbaijan; 
Armenia;
Belarus; 
Georgia; 
Kazakhstan; 
Kyrgyzstan; 
Moldavia; 
The Russian Federation; 
Tajikistan; 
Turkmenia; 
Uzbekistan; 
Ukraine.